Holiday Weather

Venice: August Weather Averages

image Temperature 73°F

23°C

image Low Temperature 64°F

18°C

image High Temperature 81°F

27°C

image Sunshine Hours 11 hrs
Chance of Sunny Day 38 %
image Rainfall 70mm
Rainfall days 9 days
Chance of Rain 28 %
Chance of Cloudy Day 5 %
image Sea Temperature 79°F

26°C

Chance of Windy Day 2 %

Averages for Venice in August

 

WEATHER LOWDOWN

Situated on the Mediterranean in the middle of a lagoon, Venice has warm, humid summers and rainy winters. August is still extremely warm in Venice and is very busy. Those of you wanting a more peaceful holiday would not be advised to travel to Venice during this time.


The average temperature reaches a high of a very warm 27°C (that's about 81°F), with minimum temperatures being around 17°C (about 63°F). Always be sure to wear sunscreen with high SPF, and duck under a café umbrella or into a bacaro during the hottest part of the day. Light clothing such as t-shirts, shorts and sandals are recommended during the day time—but if you eat out for dinner, nice casual or formal is a better bet.


There are about 14 hours of average daily sunshine. The length of the day decreases by a total of 1:25 hours, or about 2.7 daily. The longest day of the month is August 1 with 14:44 hours of sunlight, and the shortest day is August 31 with 13:19 hours.


The average sea temperature is only 26°C (about 79°F) so this is a great time of year to go rowing or sailing. You can expect to experience rain on an average of 10 days in this month. The average monthly rain is around 83mm. Chance of precipitation on any given day is 33%, mostly occurring as summer thunderstorms.

Cloud cover stays at a constant of about 28% or mostly clear with little variation. Humidity ranges from mildly humid (51%) to very humid (93%), rarely dropping below 38%. The air is driest around August 1, when humidity is below 58%, and most humid around August 11, rising above 89%.

Daily wind speed averages around 0 mph to 10 mph, low compared to the rest of the year, and rarely exceeds 18 mph. The winds typically blow in from the North to Northeast.

Temperatures begin to decline in August, tapering off by the end of the month, with the length of the day equally decreasing. August 1 enjoys about 14:45 hours of sunlight, and has an average temperature of about 23°C (74°F), with highs of (28°C 83°F) and lows of 19°C (67°F). By the middle of the month, this drops to 22°C (73°F), highs of 27°C (82°F) and lows of 19°C (66°F), and the length of the day is 14 hours. The end of August sees averages of 22°C (72°F), highs of 25°C (78°F) and lows of 16°C (62°F), and a bit more than 13 hours of sunlight during the day.

WHERE TO STAY

Hotel Londra Palace (Riva Degli Schiavoni 4171) is a classic palazzo near St. Mark’s Square, with rooms that boat views of bell towers, the lagoon and charming rooftops. A booking includes complimentary wifi, breakfast buffet and welcome drink.

At Palazzo Barbarigo (San Polo 2765), Art Deco meets sleek modern amenities on the Grand Canal. Each of its 19 guest rooms and suites are located on two floors and overlook the canal or the Rio San Polo. Guests are treated to a waterfront breakfast lounge and cocktail bar.

The dramatic and chic Palazzina G (Ramo Grassi 3247) offers rooms, suites and self-catered apartments with a 16th-century flavour. The hotel has two restaurants but for those who like to cook, each flat comes with a kitchenette and dining room, fridge, freezer, microwave and coffee maker.

The historic Grand Hotel Terme Trieste & Victoria (Via Pietro d'Abano 1, 35031 Abano Terme) may be off the main drag (30 miles from Venice), but it’s a great respite from the crowds and claustrophobia of the main city. The main draw here is the Thermal Spa, which offers everything from mud therapy to water jet massages and an on-site “aquagym.”

Located on Alberoni Beach, the Hotel Villa Beatrice (Via dei Villini, N. 4 Lido) is most impressive and high recommended among locals. Rooms are spacious with wooden furniture with large windows that look out over the garden; some even have terraces.

On the lookout for a hotel with a contemporary design? Try Palace Bonvecchiati (Calle dei Fabbri 4680), with rooms and suites on a small street tucked away from the hustle and bustle of the city. You can catch a water taxi directly from the Santa Lucia station. This modern hotel is equipped with charming terrace restaurant and spa with sauna, steam bath and whirlpool.

Ca' dei Fuseri (San Marco 4344) is a B&B with reasonable rates just off of San Luca Square. It consists of three rooms and one double suite located in the attic with views over the city's picturesque rooftops. The hotel also has a roof terrace, from where you can enjoy the panorama while munching on breakfast.

HIT THE BEACH

Alberoni is one the quieter beaches on Venice Lido. It’s not spectacular, but it is pleasant and usually less populated. The beach is in a nature reserve, with plenty of trails to wander under poplars, pines, tamarisks and oleanders. It is out of the tourist radar for the most part, which makes it a great respite from the main hubbub of Venice. You can hire a bike and explore the island, or try your hand at golf. The Circolo Golf Venezia is excellent here. To get to Alberoni, catch a 40-minute ferry to Alberoni from Venice.

Alberoni is one of the best beaches on the Lido, and a popular place for Venetians to go for a picnic. The local lagoon farm of Le Garzette (Lungomare Alberoni 32) rents out five rooms as a bed and breakfast for guests who wish to spend the night. These rooms are available as double or triples with views of the garden, sea and lagoon, with a penthouse suite for a couple on the top floor. The owners grow seasonal produce on their land, including tomatoes, peppers, eggplant, courgettes and Malamocco artichokes. The large farmhouse can accommodate special occasions such as weddings, birthdays or other events. They also provide guests with bicycles to explore Lido or the nearby isle of Pellestrina.

THINGS TO DO

Outside of the classic sites like the Doge’s Palace and the Accademia, there are plenty of galleries and museums to explore. You can browse through various scuole that dot the Venetian streets—these are old confraternity institutions, some of which hold some of the finest collections of Italian Renaissance art. Spend a half-hour admiring the Carpaccio walls at the Scuola di San Giorgio degli Schiavoni. The entrance is graced with a relief with St. George Killing the Dragon, carved in 1552 by Pietro di Salo. There is also the Scuola Grande di San Rocco (Campo San Rocco 3052) houses prominent works by Tintoretto that date back to the 18th century.

Other prominent institutions include the 18th century collections at Ca’ Rezzonico (Dorsoduro 3136), and Punta della Dogana (Dorsoduro 2), which showcases more contemporary art. The former contains applied arts by Tiepolo and Longhi, and the latter presents exhibitions from the Pinault Collection.

Centuries ago the Venetian Arsenal consisted of shipyards and armouries, where Venice's impressive navy assembled their ships that generated much of the city's wealth and power. These days you can explore its historic boat preservation centre.

The Marciano Museum on San Marco Square is a worthwhile stop on your museum tour. This building holds an impressive collection including medieval and Renaissance jewellery, mosaic, manuscripts and tapestries. Most notably, however, are the original copies of the famed bronze horses that used to stand outside in the square.

The Biblioteca Nazionale Marciana (Piazzetta S. Marco 7) is a library that holds one of the largest manuscript collections in the world. Built in the mid-16th century, the library has been a major resource of scholars of classical texts for centuries. It houses more than 1 million printed books, 13,000 manuscripts (many of which are illuminated), 2883 incunabula and scores from popular operas and sonatas.

If you’re in Venice for a while and fancy a day trip outside of the lagoon, head to one of the neighbouring cities of Verona or Padua. Here you’ll find masterpieces by Giotto, Donatello and Mantegna against the backdrop of a mountain town. Verona has a couple impressive Roman amphitheatres of note, and a Medieval castle on the banks of the river Aldige. Most famously, however is Juliet’s House, supposedly the location for the famous (but fictional) balcony love scene from Romeo and Juliet—but this is a relatively recent 1936 addition to the house.

Visitors craving an active day out might explore northern Veneto, where wooded slopes meet the precipices of the eastern Dolomites. Hike for panoramic views around Lakes Santa Caterine and Misurina, set against the dramatic Tre Cime di Lavaredo peaks. You can go by yourself, but as it requires a few transport options from Venice, it’s a more convenient use of your time to book a small group or private tour.

There are several festivals in August to attract any traveller. Mid-August equals holidays for Venetians, who will often head out to the beach or mountains to escape the mugginess of the lagoon. The Festa dell'Assunta runs from the 6th to the 14th August and is a nine day extravaganza of music, dance, theatre, poetry and sporting competitions held in Treviso. During late August or early September, the Palazzo del Cinema hosts the Venice International Film Festival (Mostra del Cinema di Venezia).

EATING & DRINKING OUT

Venice is a city of seafood, wine and cicchetti (appetisers), and you can sample everything from calamari and crostini to deep-fried mozzarella. The dinner hour is usually between 7pm to 8:30pm, earlier than most of the rest of Italy.

Osteria da Fiore (San Polo Calle del Scaleter) is one of Venice’s top restaurants, and one of the few with a Michelin star. The menu includes risotto, spider crab appetiser and set menus of pasta and seafood pairings. With its casual yet romantic atmosphere, this is a great place to bring a date.

Another highly recommended restaurant is Ai Mercanti (San Marco 4346/A - Calle dei Fuseri). Their specialties are Venetian dishes with a creative twist—try the crispy egg with potato foam and anchovies or the ravioli stuffed with rabbit and blue cheese.

Grab a light lunch at Al Portego (Castello San Lio 6014), an intimate bacaro with tasty nibbles and inexpensive wine. Or head over to Enoteca al Volto, where you can find a variety of wines and satisfying cicchetti and pastas. Entres include liver with onions, salted cod and veal roast.

The Enoiteca Mascareta (Calle Lunga 5183) is the place to go for a classy wine by the glass, shipped in from all over northeast Italy. The best hours are before the peak dinner rush at 8pm.

El Chioschetto is a small kiosk bar on the Giudecca waterfront that serves a variety of spritzes and cocktails with flatbread pizza. During the summer months they host live blues and jazz concerts. Seating is strictly outside, which explains why during the winter it tends to open up only on sunny days.

A classic favourite is Vini da Gigio (Fondamenta San Felice 3628/A), with seasonal specials like grilled duck and deep-fried crabs. The prices are more expensive than your typical osteria, but exceptional dishes and wine certainly are worth it.

The Trattoria Ca' D'Oro (Cannaregio 3192) is a historic bar locally known as La Vedova, the widow. The friendly atmosphere here can't be beat. Sample the succulent pasta and cicheti--their meatballs are famous with good reason!


 

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