Holiday Weather

Holiday Guide for Majorca

BEACHES AND RESORTS:

Most visitors come to Majorca for its great climate and wonderful beaches. There is a huge selection of beaches on the island – from quiet coves to packed resort beaches.

Playa de Palma is a 6km stretch of sandy beach lined with bars and restaurants located near to Palma airport. Part of the beach is popular with German package holiday tourists, with German bars a plenty. Head west and you get a more British clientele.

West of Palma you can find a few pleasant smaller beaches such as Cala Mayor and Illetes. Down the coast you come to the huge resorts of Palma Nova and Magaluf, both with excellent sandy beaches. Both are highly developed resorts packed with clubs, bars and restaurants and the tourists arrive in droves attracted by cheap package deals. If you’re looking for something Spanish, you won’t find it here, but if you’re after chips and a beer you’re in dreamland!

Magaluf is famous for its nightlife (though it’s perhaps not to everyone’s taste!) and attracts a young crowd. Whether the nightlife excites or appals you, it can’t be denied that the resort attracts some of Europe’s top DJs and parties last all night long throughout the summer.

The beaches at both resorts are well maintained, great for swimming and boast all the facilities you need, including a whole range of water sports.

Other good beaches on the coast west of the capital are Santa Ponca, Camp de Mar and Sant Elm.

The north-west coast of Majorca is a rugged stretch of coastline with cliffs and rocky coves. There are some great villages along the way, such as Estellencs and Banyalbufar which has a small beach set into a rocky cove. The Tramuntana mountain range rises sharply from the ocean along this coast making it one of the most scenic parts of the island.

The north-east coast is host to plenty of long sandy beaches, with a number of good tourist resorts. Three of the island’s main tourist resorts are here: Cala de Sant Vicenc, Puerto de Pollenca and Puerto de Alcudia. All have great sandy beaches and lots of facilities and, although they’re busy, they remain somewhat less brash than the big resorts near Palma.

The East Coast also has some nice beaches, some quiet and remote and some busy. The coastline is scenic with green hills sheltering rocky coves and sandy beaches. Cala Bona and Cala Millor are the popular resorts on this coast with all the amenities and entertainment you’d expect. Calas Torta and Estreta are more secluded and quiet sandy beaches. Also on the east coast, further to the north, you’ll find the Arta Caves.


SPORTS AND ACTIVITIES:

Many of Majorca’s beaches are ideal for WATER SPORTS. Jet-skiing, water-skiing, sailing, windsurfing and scuba diving are all popular on the island.

Motor and sailing yachts of various size and luxury can be chartered for the day, a week, or longer. Palma is a thriving hub for the Mediterranean yacht crowd, and is host to sailing races every year as well as being visited by some of the world’s finest luxury motor yachts.

You can find places to hire jet-skis, water skis, windsurfs and more at all the major beaches. If you’re not after an adrenalin boost, then pedalos are widely available also.

The sheltered coves of the south and east coast are especially good for scuba diving and snorkelling.

There are lots of other activities on the island as well. Hiking is popular, especially in spring and early summer when the weather is perfect. There are beautiful coastal walks, easy strolls through the quiet villages, or more demanding hikes in the Tramuntana mountain range.

Another way to explore the island, away from the large tourist resorts, is to rent a bike or scooter or car and get out on the road.

Golf is played year round, with players enjoying the great weather and excellent courses – there are nineteen in total, most of which are 18 hole courses. The island is host to the Balearic Open.

Majorca also boasts a Primera Division football club, RCD Mallorca, who play at the ONO Estadi in Palma.


HISTORY AND CULTURE:

For those looking to explore Majorca’s rich history and culture, the first stop is the island’s capital, Palma. Highlights here include the beautiful limestone Gothic Cathedral La Seu. Jaime I began construction of the cathedral in 1230, having vowed to do so if he safely survived the violent storm he found himself caught in during his voyage to the island.

Another impressive sight is the Royal Palace (Palau de l’Almudaina), and visitors should pay a visit to the old Gran Hotel, Majorca’s first luxury hotel and now home to a museum of modern art, Fundacio la Caixa. More stunning architecture is to be found at the huge sandstone Basilica de Sant Francesc, built in the 13th century.

For shopping in Palma, there is the colourful covered market, Mercat Oliver, selling flowers, fruit, fresh fish, and more. Majorcan pearls are popular as are linens, perfumes and glassware.


WATER AND AMUSEMENT PARKS:

For those days when the kids are starting to bore of the beach, Majorca is host to some great water parks and amusement parks.

You can find two water parks in MagalufWestern Park and Aqualand Magaluf. The first is a water park with a western theme, while the latter boasts such rides as the Boomerang and the Tornado. Another Aqualand can be found in El Arenal, and this is the biggest on the island.

Another popular outing for families is to Marineland, near Calvia which features excellent dolphin shows, as well as sea lion and parrot shows.a

In the Auto Safari Zoo, outside Sa Coma, you’ll find monkeys, giraffes, zebra, elephants, lions, tigers and many others. You can drive the 4km circuit yourself or take the mini train.

Another idea is the Golf Fantasia Theme Park at Palma Nova, which features three different 18 hole mini golf courses.


FESTIVALS:

Fiestas are just as important in Majorca as they are in the rest of Spain.

Perhaps the biggest is the Carnival in February, in which all the towns and villages turn into a riot of sound and colour.

There are religious celebrations around Easter and Christmas also. May sees an interesting festival, where locals dress up to re-enact a famous victory over Turkish pirates in 1561.

For bonfires and fireworks look out for St Antoni’s day, a traditional celebration every January, and Palma’s famous Nit de Foc (Night of Fire) held every June

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